Kiran Sawhney

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Archive for the ‘vegetables’ Category

Buy Organic Vegetable in Delhi

with 7 comments

I am quite particular about the quality of food I eat. I am a vegetarian and the quantity I eat is really less. So I rather make sure that the quality is very good. I like organic fruits and vegetables. One place that I can recommend in Delhi for buying organic products is Namdhari. They have one shop in Green Park Extension and the other in New Friends Colony.

They would have most exotic vegetables and other grocery items. Despite the fact that they have organic fruits and vegetables, their prices are reasonable.

Earlier they were in Green Park Market and also had amazing salad Bar. Talking about the Salad Bar, I would highly recommend Nirula’s Potpourri in CP, where they have the best spread of salad buffet for lunch.

Another place worth mentioning is Modern Bazar in Vasant Vihar. I like this because I get everything that would not be available anywhere else. A variety of cheese- low fat, fresh Mozarella, some imported herbs and spices, snacks for my growing up boys to pack in their tiffins, etc.

Similarly there is Morning Store in GK-I, M block Market. These are bit expensive stores but known for their variety.

Written by kiransawhney

October 19, 2008 at 8:11 am

Buy Organic Vegetable in Delhi

with 6 comments

I am quite particular about the quality of food I eat. I am a vegetarian and the quantity I eat is really less. So I rather make sure that the quality is very good. I like organic fruits and vegetables. One place that I can recommend in Delhi for buying organic products is Namdhari. They have one shop in Green Park Extension and the other in New Friends Colony.

They would have most exotic vegetables and other grocery items. Despite the fact that they have organic fruits and vegetables, their prices are reasonable.

Earlier they were in Green Park Market and also had amazing salad Bar. Talking about the Salad Bar, I would highly recommend Nirula’s Potpourri in CP, where they have the best spread of salad buffet for lunch.

Another place worth mentioning is Modern Bazar in Vasant Vihar. I like this because I get everything that would not be available anywhere else. A variety of cheese- low fat, fresh Mozarella, some imported herbs and spices, snacks for my growing up boys to pack in their tiffins, etc.

Similarly there is Morning Store in GK-I, M block Market. These are bit expensive stores but known for their variety.

Written by kiransawhney

October 19, 2008 at 8:11 am

organic food

leave a comment »


You’re in a bit of a dilemma standing in front of the produce section of your local supermarket. In one hand, you’re holding a conventionally grown apple. In your other hand, you have one that’s been organically grown. Both apples are firm, shiny and green. Both provide vitamins and fiber, and both are free of fat, sodium and cholesterol.
The conventionally grown apple costs less and is a proven family favorite. But the organic apple has a label that says ” Organic.” Does that mean it’s better? Safer? More nutritious? Several differences between organic and nonorganic foods exist. Become a better informed consumer for your next trip to the supermarket.

Conventional vs. organic farming
The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution. Farmers who grow organic produce and meat don’t use conventional methods to fertilize, control weeds or prevent livestock disease. For example, rather than using chemical weedkillers, organic farmers conduct sophisticated crop rotations and spread mulch or manure to keep weeds at bay.
Here are other differences between conventional farming and organic farming:

Conventional farmers
Apply chemical fertilizers to promote plant growth.
Spray insecticides to reduce pests and disease.
Use chemical herbicides to manage weeds.
Give animals antibiotics, growth hormones and medications to prevent disease and spur growth.

Organic farmers
Apply natural fertilizers, such as manure or compost, to feed soil and plants.
Use beneficial insects and birds, mating disruption or traps to reduce pests and disease.
Rotate crops, till, hand weed or mulch to manage weeds.
Give animals organic feed and allow them access to the outdoors. Use preventive measures — such as rotational grazing, a balanced diet and clean housing — to help minimize disease.

Organic food: Buy or bypass?
Many factors may influence your decision to buy — or not buy — organic food. Consider these factors:
0. Nutrition. No conclusive evidence shows that organic food is more nutritious than is conventionally grown food.
0. Quality and appearance. Organic foods meet the same quality and safety standards as conventional foods. The difference lies in how the food is produced, processed and handled. You may find that organic fruits and vegetables spoil faster because they aren’t treated with waxes or preservatives. Also, expect less-than-perfect appearances in some organic produce — odd shapes, varying colors and perhaps smaller sizes. In most cases, however, organic foods look identical to their conventional counterparts.
0. Pesticides. Conventional growers use pesticides to protect their crops from molds, insects and diseases. When farmers spray pesticides, this can leave residue on produce. Some people buy organic food to limit their exposure to these residues. Most experts agree, however, that the amount of pesticides found on fruits and vegetables poses a very small health risk.
0. Environment. Some people buy organic food for environmental reasons. Organic farming practices are designed to benefit the environment by reducing pollution and conserving water and soil.
0. Cost. Most organic food costs more than conventional food products. Higher prices are due to more expensive farming practices, tighter government regulations and lower crop yields. Because organic farmers don’t use herbicides or pesticides, many management tools that control weeds and pests are labor intensive. For example, organic growers may hand weed vegetables to control weeds, and you may end up paying more for these vegetables.
0. Taste. Some people say they can taste the difference between organic and nonorganic food. Others say they find no difference. Taste is a subjective and personal consideration, so decide for yourself. But whether you buy organic or not, finding the freshest foods available may have the biggest impact on taste.

Buying tips
Whether you’re already a fan of organic foods or you just want to shop wisely and handle your food safely, consider these tips:

0. Buy fruits and vegetables in season to ensure the highest quality. Also, try to buy your produce the day it’s delivered to market to ensure that you’re buying the freshest food possible. Ask your grocer what day new produce arrives.

0. Read food labels carefully. Just because a product says it’s organic or contains organic ingredients doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a healthier alternative. Some organic products may still be high in sugar, salt, fat or calories.

0. Don’t confuse natural foods with organic foods.

0. Wash all fresh fruits and vegetables thoroughly with running water to reduce the amount of dirt and bacteria. If appropriate, use a small scrub brush — for example, before eating apples, potatoes, cucumbers or other produce in which you eat the outer skin.

If you’re concerned about pesticides, peel your fruits and vegetables and trim outer leaves of leafy vegetables in addition to washing them thoroughly. Keep in mind that peeling your fruits and vegetables may also reduce the amount of nutrients and fiber. Some pesticide residue also collects in fat, so remove fat from meat and the skin from poultry and fish.

Written by kiransawhney

June 13, 2008 at 4:40 pm

organic food

leave a comment »


You’re in a bit of a dilemma standing in front of the produce section of your local supermarket. In one hand, you’re holding a conventionally grown apple. In your other hand, you have one that’s been organically grown. Both apples are firm, shiny and green. Both provide vitamins and fiber, and both are free of fat, sodium and cholesterol.
The conventionally grown apple costs less and is a proven family favorite. But the organic apple has a label that says ” Organic.” Does that mean it’s better? Safer? More nutritious? Several differences between organic and nonorganic foods exist. Become a better informed consumer for your next trip to the supermarket.

Conventional vs. organic farming
The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution. Farmers who grow organic produce and meat don’t use conventional methods to fertilize, control weeds or prevent livestock disease. For example, rather than using chemical weedkillers, organic farmers conduct sophisticated crop rotations and spread mulch or manure to keep weeds at bay.
Here are other differences between conventional farming and organic farming:

Conventional farmers
Apply chemical fertilizers to promote plant growth.
Spray insecticides to reduce pests and disease.
Use chemical herbicides to manage weeds.
Give animals antibiotics, growth hormones and medications to prevent disease and spur growth.

Organic farmers
Apply natural fertilizers, such as manure or compost, to feed soil and plants.
Use beneficial insects and birds, mating disruption or traps to reduce pests and disease.
Rotate crops, till, hand weed or mulch to manage weeds.
Give animals organic feed and allow them access to the outdoors. Use preventive measures — such as rotational grazing, a balanced diet and clean housing — to help minimize disease.

Organic food: Buy or bypass?
Many factors may influence your decision to buy — or not buy — organic food. Consider these factors:
0. Nutrition. No conclusive evidence shows that organic food is more nutritious than is conventionally grown food.
0. Quality and appearance. Organic foods meet the same quality and safety standards as conventional foods. The difference lies in how the food is produced, processed and handled. You may find that organic fruits and vegetables spoil faster because they aren’t treated with waxes or preservatives. Also, expect less-than-perfect appearances in some organic produce — odd shapes, varying colors and perhaps smaller sizes. In most cases, however, organic foods look identical to their conventional counterparts.
0. Pesticides. Conventional growers use pesticides to protect their crops from molds, insects and diseases. When farmers spray pesticides, this can leave residue on produce. Some people buy organic food to limit their exposure to these residues. Most experts agree, however, that the amount of pesticides found on fruits and vegetables poses a very small health risk.
0. Environment. Some people buy organic food for environmental reasons. Organic farming practices are designed to benefit the environment by reducing pollution and conserving water and soil.
0. Cost. Most organic food costs more than conventional food products. Higher prices are due to more expensive farming practices, tighter government regulations and lower crop yields. Because organic farmers don’t use herbicides or pesticides, many management tools that control weeds and pests are labor intensive. For example, organic growers may hand weed vegetables to control weeds, and you may end up paying more for these vegetables.
0. Taste. Some people say they can taste the difference between organic and nonorganic food. Others say they find no difference. Taste is a subjective and personal consideration, so decide for yourself. But whether you buy organic or not, finding the freshest foods available may have the biggest impact on taste.

Buying tips
Whether you’re already a fan of organic foods or you just want to shop wisely and handle your food safely, consider these tips:

0. Buy fruits and vegetables in season to ensure the highest quality. Also, try to buy your produce the day it’s delivered to market to ensure that you’re buying the freshest food possible. Ask your grocer what day new produce arrives.

0. Read food labels carefully. Just because a product says it’s organic or contains organic ingredients doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a healthier alternative. Some organic products may still be high in sugar, salt, fat or calories.

0. Don’t confuse natural foods with organic foods.

0. Wash all fresh fruits and vegetables thoroughly with running water to reduce the amount of dirt and bacteria. If appropriate, use a small scrub brush — for example, before eating apples, potatoes, cucumbers or other produce in which you eat the outer skin.

If you’re concerned about pesticides, peel your fruits and vegetables and trim outer leaves of leafy vegetables in addition to washing them thoroughly. Keep in mind that peeling your fruits and vegetables may also reduce the amount of nutrients and fiber. Some pesticide residue also collects in fat, so remove fat from meat and the skin from poultry and fish.

Written by kiransawhney

June 13, 2008 at 4:40 pm

organic food

leave a comment »


You’re in a bit of a dilemma standing in front of the produce section of your local supermarket. In one hand, you’re holding a conventionally grown apple. In your other hand, you have one that’s been organically grown. Both apples are firm, shiny and green. Both provide vitamins and fiber, and both are free of fat, sodium and cholesterol.
The conventionally grown apple costs less and is a proven family favorite. But the organic apple has a label that says ” Organic.” Does that mean it’s better? Safer? More nutritious? Several differences between organic and nonorganic foods exist. Become a better informed consumer for your next trip to the supermarket.

Conventional vs. organic farming
The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution. Farmers who grow organic produce and meat don’t use conventional methods to fertilize, control weeds or prevent livestock disease. For example, rather than using chemical weedkillers, organic farmers conduct sophisticated crop rotations and spread mulch or manure to keep weeds at bay.
Here are other differences between conventional farming and organic farming:

Conventional farmers
Apply chemical fertilizers to promote plant growth.
Spray insecticides to reduce pests and disease.
Use chemical herbicides to manage weeds.
Give animals antibiotics, growth hormones and medications to prevent disease and spur growth.

Organic farmers
Apply natural fertilizers, such as manure or compost, to feed soil and plants.
Use beneficial insects and birds, mating disruption or traps to reduce pests and disease.
Rotate crops, till, hand weed or mulch to manage weeds.
Give animals organic feed and allow them access to the outdoors. Use preventive measures — such as rotational grazing, a balanced diet and clean housing — to help minimize disease.

Organic food: Buy or bypass?
Many factors may influence your decision to buy — or not buy — organic food. Consider these factors:
0. Nutrition. No conclusive evidence shows that organic food is more nutritious than is conventionally grown food.
0. Quality and appearance. Organic foods meet the same quality and safety standards as conventional foods. The difference lies in how the food is produced, processed and handled. You may find that organic fruits and vegetables spoil faster because they aren’t treated with waxes or preservatives. Also, expect less-than-perfect appearances in some organic produce — odd shapes, varying colors and perhaps smaller sizes. In most cases, however, organic foods look identical to their conventional counterparts.
0. Pesticides. Conventional growers use pesticides to protect their crops from molds, insects and diseases. When farmers spray pesticides, this can leave residue on produce. Some people buy organic food to limit their exposure to these residues. Most experts agree, however, that the amount of pesticides found on fruits and vegetables poses a very small health risk.
0. Environment. Some people buy organic food for environmental reasons. Organic farming practices are designed to benefit the environment by reducing pollution and conserving water and soil.
0. Cost. Most organic food costs more than conventional food products. Higher prices are due to more expensive farming practices, tighter government regulations and lower crop yields. Because organic farmers don’t use herbicides or pesticides, many management tools that control weeds and pests are labor intensive. For example, organic growers may hand weed vegetables to control weeds, and you may end up paying more for these vegetables.
0. Taste. Some people say they can taste the difference between organic and nonorganic food. Others say they find no difference. Taste is a subjective and personal consideration, so decide for yourself. But whether you buy organic or not, finding the freshest foods available may have the biggest impact on taste.

Buying tips
Whether you’re already a fan of organic foods or you just want to shop wisely and handle your food safely, consider these tips:

0. Buy fruits and vegetables in season to ensure the highest quality. Also, try to buy your produce the day it’s delivered to market to ensure that you’re buying the freshest food possible. Ask your grocer what day new produce arrives.

0. Read food labels carefully. Just because a product says it’s organic or contains organic ingredients doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a healthier alternative. Some organic products may still be high in sugar, salt, fat or calories.

0. Don’t confuse natural foods with organic foods.

0. Wash all fresh fruits and vegetables thoroughly with running water to reduce the amount of dirt and bacteria. If appropriate, use a small scrub brush — for example, before eating apples, potatoes, cucumbers or other produce in which you eat the outer skin.

If you’re concerned about pesticides, peel your fruits and vegetables and trim outer leaves of leafy vegetables in addition to washing them thoroughly. Keep in mind that peeling your fruits and vegetables may also reduce the amount of nutrients and fiber. Some pesticide residue also collects in fat, so remove fat from meat and the skin from poultry and fish.

Written by kiransawhney

June 13, 2008 at 4:40 pm

calories table

leave a comment »


Vegetables
(per 100 grams) Calories
Cabbage 45
Carrot 48
Cauliflower 30
Corn (baked) 84
Cucumber 12
Eggplant (Fresh) 24
Eggplant (Cooked) 69
Fenugreek (methi) 49
French Beans 26
Lettuce 21
Onion 50
Peas 93
Potato 97
Potato (fried- 1 cup) 450
Potato (baked- 1 cup) 100
Potato (mashed- 1 cup) 245
Potato (boiled- 1 cup) 83
Pumpkin (cooked) 33
Spinach 26
Tomato (fresh) 21
Tomato (stuffed and baked) 58
Tomato (baked) 39

Fruits
(per 100 grams) Calories
Apple 56
Banana 153
Black Grapes 45
Chickoo 94
Cherries 70
Dates 281
Guava 66
Litchies 61
Mango 70
Melon 74
Orange 53
Papaya 32
Peach 50
Pears 51
Pineapple 46
Plums 56
Pomegranate 77
Watermelon 16

Cereals
(per 100 grams) Calories
Bajra 360
Maize flour 355
Rice 325
Wheat flour 341

Breads
(per slice) Calories
Chapati (wheat bread) (medium) 119
White bread 60
Paratha (not stuffed) 280

Desserts (per 100 grams) Calories
Biscuits 399
Boondi ladoo 150
Cake (with icing) 302
Cake (without icing) 218
Cookies (butter cookies) 482
Custard 205
Fruit pie 236
Fruit salad 80
Gujia 501
Gulab Jamun 387
Halwa (atta) 263
Halwa (rawa) 181
Halwa (sohan halwa) 399
Jalebi 494
Jelly 65
Kheer (rice) 141
Kheer (rice-carrot) 226
Maalpua 325
Sandesh 57

Milk and Milk Products (per cup) Calories

Buffalo milk 115
Butter (100gms.) 750
Buttermilk 19
Cheese 315
Cow milk 100
Cream (100gms) 210
Ghee (100gms) 910
Skimmed milk 45

Miscellaneous Calories

Coconut water (100 ml) 25
Coffee 40
Honey (1 tbsp) 90
Orange juice (100 ml) 47
Sugar (1 tbsp) 48
Tea 30
Tomato juice (100ml) 22

Estimated calorie burning for common activities based on 135 lbs woman
10% more calories will be burnt for every 15 lbs over 135 lbs.
10% less calories will be burnt for every 15 lbs below 135 lbs.

Activity (30 minutes) Calories

Aerobic Dance 178
Basketball 258
Bicycling (10 mph, level ground) 189
Bowling (competitive) 108
Canoeing (vigorous) 192
Croquet 111
Field Hockey 249
Fishing 114
Golf (carrying clubs) 162
Golf (power cart) 108
Handball (leisure) 270
Handball (vigorous) 297
Horseback riding (galloping) 255
Horseback riding (trotting) 204
Horseback riding (walking) 75
Ice skating (fast pace) 315
Ice skating (slow pace) 199
Judo 363
Jumping rope 223
Mountain climbing 270
Rowing machine 378
Roller skating (fast pace) 315
Roller skating (slow pace) 199
Running (5.5 mph) 295
Running (7.5 mph) 426
Skiing (cross-country, 2.5 mph) 252
Skiing (cross-country, 8.0 mph) 459
Skiing (downhill) 247
Sleeping 32
Squash 393
Swimming (breast stroke, 1.0 mph) 300
Swimming (crawl, fast) 291
Swimming (back stroke) 341
Tennis (singles) 216
Tennis (doubles) 162
Volleyball 93
Walking (3.0 to 3.5 mph) 130


Breakfast Cereal
Calorie Counter
Calorie content Fat grams
Bran Flakes, Kelloggs (45g)
144 1.1
Corn Flakes, Kelloggs (45g)
167 0.4
Corn Flakes, Crunchy Nut, Kelloggs (45g)
176 1.6
Porridge Oats, Scots, Quaker (45g)
166 3.6
Rice Krispies, Kelloggs (45g)
171 0.5
Shredded Wheat, Nestle (2 pieces/44g)
143 0.9
Special K, Kelloggs (45g)
166 0.5
Weetabix (2 biscuits/37½g)
129 1.0
Calories in Alcohol
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a Baileys Irish Cream (37ml)
129 5.8
Calories in a pint of beer
182 0
Calories in a pint of Guinness
170 0
Calories in gin, 40% alcohol (25ml)
55 0
Calories in sherry (50ml)
68 0
Calories in wine (1 glass/120ml)
87 0
Calories in vodka, 40% alcohol (25ml)
55 0
Calories in Bread and Bakery
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a bagel (85g)
216 1.4
Calories in a biscuit (15g)
74 3.3
Calories in a low fat biscuit (14g)
65 2.3
Calories in bread, white (1 slice/37g)
84 0.6
Calories in bread, wholemeal (1 slice/36g)
79 1.0
Calories in a Danish pastry (67g)
287 17.4
Calories in a doughnut (49g)
140 2.0
Calories in a hot cross bun (70g)
205 3.9
Calories in a jaffa cake (12g)
46 1.0
Calories in a scone (70g)
225 7.6
Calories in Eggs and Dairy
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in butter (10g)
74 8.2
Calories in cheese, cheddar (40g)
172 14.8
Calories in cheese, cream (34g)
58 4.8
Calories in eggs, size 3 (57g)
84 6.2
Calories in milk, semi skimmed (200ml)
96 3.2
Calories in Fruit
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in an apple (112g)
53 0.1
Calories in an avocado pear (145g)
275 28.3
Calories in a banana (150g)
143 0.5
Calories in grapes (50g)
30 0.1
Calories in melon (1oz/28g)
7 0.1
Calories in an orange (160g)
59 0
Calories in a pear (170g)
68 0.2
Calories in strawberries (1oz/28g)
7 0

Calories in Indian Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in Bombay Potato (200g)
202 10.4
Calories in an Onion Bhaji (22g)
65 5.1
Calories in a Chicken Korma (300g)
498 31.0
Calories in a Chicken Tikka (150g)
232 6.2
Calories in a poppadum (12g)
49 2.2
Calories in a Samosa (50g)
126 6.6
Calories in Vegetables
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in carrots (60g)
13 0.2
Calories in celery (40g)
2 0.1
Calories in chips (100g)
253 9.9
Calories in peas (60g)
32 0.4
Calories in a jacket potato (180g)
245 0.4
Calories in a salad (100g)
19 0.3
Calories in Chicken and Meat
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in bacon (1 rasher/25g)
64 4.0
Calories in a chicken breast (200g)
342 13.0
Calories in gravy, beef (83ml)
45 2.7
Calories in ham (1 slice/30g)
35 1.0
Calories in a kebab (168g)
429 28.6
Calories in Chinese Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in Chinese bean sprouts (150g)
92 8.6
Calories in Beef in black bean (386g)
432 16.6
Calories in Chicken and Cashew (350g)
311 14.0
Calories in Chicken Balls (1 ball/46g)
45 2.2
Calories in Egg Fried Rice (200g)
250 3.0
Calories in Chocolate and Sweets
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in chocolate (100g)
530 29.9
Calories in a Cadbury’s Creme Egg (39g)
174 6.2

Calories in chocolate ice cream (50g)
159 10.4
Calories in Jelly Babies (1 baby/6g)
20 0.0
Calories in a Mars Bar (65g)
294 11.4
Calories in popcorn (100g)
405 7.7
Calories in low cal sweetener (1 tsp/1g)
4 0.0
Calories in Drinks
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in coffee (1 cup/220ml)
15.4 0.9
Calories in a can of coke (330ml)
139 0.0
Calories in orange juice (1 glass/200ml)
88 0.0
Calories in tea (1 mug/270ml)
29 0.5
Calories in Fast Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a Big Mac (215g)
492 23.0
Calories in a cheeseburger
379 18.9
Calories in Kentucky Fried Chicken (67g)
195 12.0
Calories in a hamburger (108g)
254 7.7
Calories in Pizza Deluxe (1 slice/66g)
171 6.7
Calories in Pizza (½ pizza/135g)
263 4.9
Calories in Potato Wedges (135g)
279 13.0
Calories in Low Calorie and Low Fat Foods
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in cheese spread, low fat (50g)
56 1.5
Calories is Chicken Tikka Masala, low fat (400g)
360 4.0
Calories in low fat cookies (23g)
82 1.0
Calories in garlic bread, low fat (84g)
94 2.7
Calories in a hot cross bun, low fat (65g)
161 1.7
Calories in a low calorie ice cream (60g)
71 3.6
Calories in low calorie mayonnaise (11g)
33 3.3
Calories in low calorie lasagne (300g)
255 9.0
Calories in a rice cake (10g)
38 3.2
Calories in a low calorie chicken sandwich (169g)
270 4.2

Written by kiransawhney

June 4, 2008 at 12:13 am

calories table

leave a comment »


Vegetables
(per 100 grams) Calories
Cabbage 45
Carrot 48
Cauliflower 30
Corn (baked) 84
Cucumber 12
Eggplant (Fresh) 24
Eggplant (Cooked) 69
Fenugreek (methi) 49
French Beans 26
Lettuce 21
Onion 50
Peas 93
Potato 97
Potato (fried- 1 cup) 450
Potato (baked- 1 cup) 100
Potato (mashed- 1 cup) 245
Potato (boiled- 1 cup) 83
Pumpkin (cooked) 33
Spinach 26
Tomato (fresh) 21
Tomato (stuffed and baked) 58
Tomato (baked) 39

Fruits
(per 100 grams) Calories
Apple 56
Banana 153
Black Grapes 45
Chickoo 94
Cherries 70
Dates 281
Guava 66
Litchies 61
Mango 70
Melon 74
Orange 53
Papaya 32
Peach 50
Pears 51
Pineapple 46
Plums 56
Pomegranate 77
Watermelon 16

Cereals
(per 100 grams) Calories
Bajra 360
Maize flour 355
Rice 325
Wheat flour 341

Breads
(per slice) Calories
Chapati (wheat bread) (medium) 119
White bread 60
Paratha (not stuffed) 280

Desserts (per 100 grams) Calories
Biscuits 399
Boondi ladoo 150
Cake (with icing) 302
Cake (without icing) 218
Cookies (butter cookies) 482
Custard 205
Fruit pie 236
Fruit salad 80
Gujia 501
Gulab Jamun 387
Halwa (atta) 263
Halwa (rawa) 181
Halwa (sohan halwa) 399
Jalebi 494
Jelly 65
Kheer (rice) 141
Kheer (rice-carrot) 226
Maalpua 325
Sandesh 57

Milk and Milk Products (per cup) Calories

Buffalo milk 115
Butter (100gms.) 750
Buttermilk 19
Cheese 315
Cow milk 100
Cream (100gms) 210
Ghee (100gms) 910
Skimmed milk 45

Miscellaneous Calories

Coconut water (100 ml) 25
Coffee 40
Honey (1 tbsp) 90
Orange juice (100 ml) 47
Sugar (1 tbsp) 48
Tea 30
Tomato juice (100ml) 22

Estimated calorie burning for common activities based on 135 lbs woman
10% more calories will be burnt for every 15 lbs over 135 lbs.
10% less calories will be burnt for every 15 lbs below 135 lbs.

Activity (30 minutes) Calories

Aerobic Dance 178
Basketball 258
Bicycling (10 mph, level ground) 189
Bowling (competitive) 108
Canoeing (vigorous) 192
Croquet 111
Field Hockey 249
Fishing 114
Golf (carrying clubs) 162
Golf (power cart) 108
Handball (leisure) 270
Handball (vigorous) 297
Horseback riding (galloping) 255
Horseback riding (trotting) 204
Horseback riding (walking) 75
Ice skating (fast pace) 315
Ice skating (slow pace) 199
Judo 363
Jumping rope 223
Mountain climbing 270
Rowing machine 378
Roller skating (fast pace) 315
Roller skating (slow pace) 199
Running (5.5 mph) 295
Running (7.5 mph) 426
Skiing (cross-country, 2.5 mph) 252
Skiing (cross-country, 8.0 mph) 459
Skiing (downhill) 247
Sleeping 32
Squash 393
Swimming (breast stroke, 1.0 mph) 300
Swimming (crawl, fast) 291
Swimming (back stroke) 341
Tennis (singles) 216
Tennis (doubles) 162
Volleyball 93
Walking (3.0 to 3.5 mph) 130


Breakfast Cereal
Calorie Counter
Calorie content Fat grams
Bran Flakes, Kelloggs (45g)
144 1.1
Corn Flakes, Kelloggs (45g)
167 0.4
Corn Flakes, Crunchy Nut, Kelloggs (45g)
176 1.6
Porridge Oats, Scots, Quaker (45g)
166 3.6
Rice Krispies, Kelloggs (45g)
171 0.5
Shredded Wheat, Nestle (2 pieces/44g)
143 0.9
Special K, Kelloggs (45g)
166 0.5
Weetabix (2 biscuits/37½g)
129 1.0
Calories in Alcohol
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a Baileys Irish Cream (37ml)
129 5.8
Calories in a pint of beer
182 0
Calories in a pint of Guinness
170 0
Calories in gin, 40% alcohol (25ml)
55 0
Calories in sherry (50ml)
68 0
Calories in wine (1 glass/120ml)
87 0
Calories in vodka, 40% alcohol (25ml)
55 0
Calories in Bread and Bakery
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a bagel (85g)
216 1.4
Calories in a biscuit (15g)
74 3.3
Calories in a low fat biscuit (14g)
65 2.3
Calories in bread, white (1 slice/37g)
84 0.6
Calories in bread, wholemeal (1 slice/36g)
79 1.0
Calories in a Danish pastry (67g)
287 17.4
Calories in a doughnut (49g)
140 2.0
Calories in a hot cross bun (70g)
205 3.9
Calories in a jaffa cake (12g)
46 1.0
Calories in a scone (70g)
225 7.6
Calories in Eggs and Dairy
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in butter (10g)
74 8.2
Calories in cheese, cheddar (40g)
172 14.8
Calories in cheese, cream (34g)
58 4.8
Calories in eggs, size 3 (57g)
84 6.2
Calories in milk, semi skimmed (200ml)
96 3.2
Calories in Fruit
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in an apple (112g)
53 0.1
Calories in an avocado pear (145g)
275 28.3
Calories in a banana (150g)
143 0.5
Calories in grapes (50g)
30 0.1
Calories in melon (1oz/28g)
7 0.1
Calories in an orange (160g)
59 0
Calories in a pear (170g)
68 0.2
Calories in strawberries (1oz/28g)
7 0

Calories in Indian Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in Bombay Potato (200g)
202 10.4
Calories in an Onion Bhaji (22g)
65 5.1
Calories in a Chicken Korma (300g)
498 31.0
Calories in a Chicken Tikka (150g)
232 6.2
Calories in a poppadum (12g)
49 2.2
Calories in a Samosa (50g)
126 6.6
Calories in Vegetables
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in carrots (60g)
13 0.2
Calories in celery (40g)
2 0.1
Calories in chips (100g)
253 9.9
Calories in peas (60g)
32 0.4
Calories in a jacket potato (180g)
245 0.4
Calories in a salad (100g)
19 0.3
Calories in Chicken and Meat
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in bacon (1 rasher/25g)
64 4.0
Calories in a chicken breast (200g)
342 13.0
Calories in gravy, beef (83ml)
45 2.7
Calories in ham (1 slice/30g)
35 1.0
Calories in a kebab (168g)
429 28.6
Calories in Chinese Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in Chinese bean sprouts (150g)
92 8.6
Calories in Beef in black bean (386g)
432 16.6
Calories in Chicken and Cashew (350g)
311 14.0
Calories in Chicken Balls (1 ball/46g)
45 2.2
Calories in Egg Fried Rice (200g)
250 3.0
Calories in Chocolate and Sweets
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in chocolate (100g)
530 29.9
Calories in a Cadbury’s Creme Egg (39g)
174 6.2

Calories in chocolate ice cream (50g)
159 10.4
Calories in Jelly Babies (1 baby/6g)
20 0.0
Calories in a Mars Bar (65g)
294 11.4
Calories in popcorn (100g)
405 7.7
Calories in low cal sweetener (1 tsp/1g)
4 0.0
Calories in Drinks
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in coffee (1 cup/220ml)
15.4 0.9
Calories in a can of coke (330ml)
139 0.0
Calories in orange juice (1 glass/200ml)
88 0.0
Calories in tea (1 mug/270ml)
29 0.5
Calories in Fast Food
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in a Big Mac (215g)
492 23.0
Calories in a cheeseburger
379 18.9
Calories in Kentucky Fried Chicken (67g)
195 12.0
Calories in a hamburger (108g)
254 7.7
Calories in Pizza Deluxe (1 slice/66g)
171 6.7
Calories in Pizza (½ pizza/135g)
263 4.9
Calories in Potato Wedges (135g)
279 13.0
Calories in Low Calorie and Low Fat Foods
Calorie content Fat grams
Calories in cheese spread, low fat (50g)
56 1.5
Calories is Chicken Tikka Masala, low fat (400g)
360 4.0
Calories in low fat cookies (23g)
82 1.0
Calories in garlic bread, low fat (84g)
94 2.7
Calories in a hot cross bun, low fat (65g)
161 1.7
Calories in a low calorie ice cream (60g)
71 3.6
Calories in low calorie mayonnaise (11g)
33 3.3
Calories in low calorie lasagne (300g)
255 9.0
Calories in a rice cake (10g)
38 3.2
Calories in a low calorie chicken sandwich (169g)
270 4.2

Written by kiransawhney

June 4, 2008 at 12:13 am