Kiran Sawhney

Know me, know life. No me, No Life

Archive for the ‘blood volume’ Category

Drink Water while exercise

leave a comment »


We hear a lot about what we should eat to stay healthy, but there’s one thing we need even more than food each day – and that’s water. Although we all know the importance of drinking enough water during the hot summer months, many people don’t realize they need to drink plenty of water all year round. Every part of your body needs water to work properly, but water is particularly important for keeping the kidneys healthy. Dehydration (lack of water) is one of the reasons why people develop kidney stones.

“I don’t need water because I don’t get thirsty”, some people say. But that’s because thirst can be slow to develop – often we don’t feel thirst even when our bodies need fluid. We often confuse thirst with hunger too. Sometimes when you think your body is asking for food, what it really needs is water. This is why it’s a good habit to drink water regularly – whether you feel thirsty or not. Most of us need between 1.5 and 2.5 litres each day. When your urine is clear, rather than yellow, you are sufficiently hydrated. But if the weather is hot or you are exercising, you need more. You need water both before in between and after exercise.

Many women retain fluid before a period and think that drinking less water will help. But in fact they need to drink more. One of the causes of fluid retention is having too much of a mineral called sodium in the body. But drinking water helps get rid of sodium.
In short: DRINK YOUR WATER!

Several times we have discussed the importance of adequate hydration. That is, drinking plenty of water. The following are some of the health conditions that can result from not drinking adequate water.

◊Decreased athletic performance
◊Decreased blood flow to the skin
◊Decreased blood volume
◊Decrease cardiac output
◊Decreased performance
◊Decreased sweat production therefore making it harder to cool down
◊Increased body temperature
◊Increased use of muscle glycogen
◊Reduction in bodies ability to burn fat
◊Retention of salt in the body
◊Strain on kidneys
◊Water retention (when you drink enough water your body only keeps what it needs)

Written by kiransawhney

June 6, 2008 at 10:25 pm

Drink Water while exercise

leave a comment »


We hear a lot about what we should eat to stay healthy, but there’s one thing we need even more than food each day – and that’s water. Although we all know the importance of drinking enough water during the hot summer months, many people don’t realize they need to drink plenty of water all year round. Every part of your body needs water to work properly, but water is particularly important for keeping the kidneys healthy. Dehydration (lack of water) is one of the reasons why people develop kidney stones.

“I don’t need water because I don’t get thirsty”, some people say. But that’s because thirst can be slow to develop – often we don’t feel thirst even when our bodies need fluid. We often confuse thirst with hunger too. Sometimes when you think your body is asking for food, what it really needs is water. This is why it’s a good habit to drink water regularly – whether you feel thirsty or not. Most of us need between 1.5 and 2.5 litres each day. When your urine is clear, rather than yellow, you are sufficiently hydrated. But if the weather is hot or you are exercising, you need more. You need water both before in between and after exercise.

Many women retain fluid before a period and think that drinking less water will help. But in fact they need to drink more. One of the causes of fluid retention is having too much of a mineral called sodium in the body. But drinking water helps get rid of sodium.
In short: DRINK YOUR WATER!

Several times we have discussed the importance of adequate hydration. That is, drinking plenty of water. The following are some of the health conditions that can result from not drinking adequate water.

◊Decreased athletic performance
◊Decreased blood flow to the skin
◊Decreased blood volume
◊Decrease cardiac output
◊Decreased performance
◊Decreased sweat production therefore making it harder to cool down
◊Increased body temperature
◊Increased use of muscle glycogen
◊Reduction in bodies ability to burn fat
◊Retention of salt in the body
◊Strain on kidneys
◊Water retention (when you drink enough water your body only keeps what it needs)

Written by kiransawhney

June 6, 2008 at 10:25 pm

Drink Water while exercise

leave a comment »


We hear a lot about what we should eat to stay healthy, but there’s one thing we need even more than food each day – and that’s water. Although we all know the importance of drinking enough water during the hot summer months, many people don’t realize they need to drink plenty of water all year round. Every part of your body needs water to work properly, but water is particularly important for keeping the kidneys healthy. Dehydration (lack of water) is one of the reasons why people develop kidney stones.

“I don’t need water because I don’t get thirsty”, some people say. But that’s because thirst can be slow to develop – often we don’t feel thirst even when our bodies need fluid. We often confuse thirst with hunger too. Sometimes when you think your body is asking for food, what it really needs is water. This is why it’s a good habit to drink water regularly – whether you feel thirsty or not. Most of us need between 1.5 and 2.5 litres each day. When your urine is clear, rather than yellow, you are sufficiently hydrated. But if the weather is hot or you are exercising, you need more. You need water both before in between and after exercise.

Many women retain fluid before a period and think that drinking less water will help. But in fact they need to drink more. One of the causes of fluid retention is having too much of a mineral called sodium in the body. But drinking water helps get rid of sodium.
In short: DRINK YOUR WATER!

Several times we have discussed the importance of adequate hydration. That is, drinking plenty of water. The following are some of the health conditions that can result from not drinking adequate water.

◊Decreased athletic performance
◊Decreased blood flow to the skin
◊Decreased blood volume
◊Decrease cardiac output
◊Decreased performance
◊Decreased sweat production therefore making it harder to cool down
◊Increased body temperature
◊Increased use of muscle glycogen
◊Reduction in bodies ability to burn fat
◊Retention of salt in the body
◊Strain on kidneys
◊Water retention (when you drink enough water your body only keeps what it needs)

Written by kiransawhney

June 6, 2008 at 10:25 pm