Kiran Sawhney

Know me, know life. No me, No Life

Archive for the ‘best bosu workout’ Category

Bosu- Strength Training-Series 34

leave a comment »

1. Bench Press

The bench press is a strength training exercise in which, while lying on his back on top of a Bosu, the person performing the bench press lowers a weight to the level of the chest, then pushes it back up until the arm is straight and the elbows locked (or close to this position). The exercise focuses on the development of the pectoralis major muscle as well as other supporting muscles including the anterior deltoids, serratus anterior, coracobrachialis, and the triceps. The bench press is one of the three lifts in the sport of powerlifting and is used extensively in weight training, bodybuilding and other types of fitness training to develop the chest.

A starting position is to be lying on a Bosu, with the shoulder blades pinched together to avoid recruiting the anterior deltoid during the lift. Feet are kept flat on the ground or end of the Bosu. The weight is gripped with hands equidistant from the center of the bar, with the elbows bent to 90° and the elbows beneath the wrists. Movement starts by lifting the bar or Dumbells off the pins, and lowering it until it touches the chest. The weight is then pushed off the chest, terminating when the arms are straight, at which point the weight can be lowered again. After the desired number of repetitions, the bar is returned to the pins. Because of the heavy weight that can be used and the position of the bar, a ‘spotting partner’ increases the safety of the movement at heavier weights.

Angle The incline-version shifts some of the stress from the pectorals to the anterior deltoids and gives a greater stimulus to the upper pectorals, whereas the decline allows more weight to be lifted while using nearly the same musculature as the traditional bench press.
Hand position – Varying width grips can be used to shift stress between pectorals and triceps. A wide grip will focus on the pectorals. A narrow, shoulder width grip will focus more on the triceps.
Type of weight – Instead of a bar, the bench press can also be performed with dumbbells which incorporate more use of stabilizer muscles. Dumbbells may be safer to use without a spotting partner, as they may be dropped to the side with less risk of injury.

Repetitions

Different repetition patterns can be used to achieve different goals.[2] For instance:
Muscular endurance – 15 to 20 repetitions with a light weight (50–60% of 1rm), with a goal of increasing intramuscular stores of phosphocreatine and ATP, as well as speeding clearance of muscle contraction byproducts
Muscular strength – 2 to 6 repetitions with heavier weight (80–90% of 1rm) to build contractile proteins
Muscular hypertrophy – To increase muscle size, 6–12 repetitions with a weight equivalent to 60–80% of one’s 1rm should be carried out.

Advertisements

Written by kiransawhney

August 26, 2008 at 7:50 am

Bosu- Strength Training-Series 34

leave a comment »

1. Bench Press

The bench press is a strength training exercise in which, while lying on his back on top of a Bosu, the person performing the bench press lowers a weight to the level of the chest, then pushes it back up until the arm is straight and the elbows locked (or close to this position). The exercise focuses on the development of the pectoralis major muscle as well as other supporting muscles including the anterior deltoids, serratus anterior, coracobrachialis, and the triceps. The bench press is one of the three lifts in the sport of powerlifting and is used extensively in weight training, bodybuilding and other types of fitness training to develop the chest.

A starting position is to be lying on a Bosu, with the shoulder blades pinched together to avoid recruiting the anterior deltoid during the lift. Feet are kept flat on the ground or end of the Bosu. The weight is gripped with hands equidistant from the center of the bar, with the elbows bent to 90° and the elbows beneath the wrists. Movement starts by lifting the bar or Dumbells off the pins, and lowering it until it touches the chest. The weight is then pushed off the chest, terminating when the arms are straight, at which point the weight can be lowered again. After the desired number of repetitions, the bar is returned to the pins. Because of the heavy weight that can be used and the position of the bar, a ‘spotting partner’ increases the safety of the movement at heavier weights.

Angle The incline-version shifts some of the stress from the pectorals to the anterior deltoids and gives a greater stimulus to the upper pectorals, whereas the decline allows more weight to be lifted while using nearly the same musculature as the traditional bench press.
Hand position – Varying width grips can be used to shift stress between pectorals and triceps. A wide grip will focus on the pectorals. A narrow, shoulder width grip will focus more on the triceps.
Type of weight – Instead of a bar, the bench press can also be performed with dumbbells which incorporate more use of stabilizer muscles. Dumbbells may be safer to use without a spotting partner, as they may be dropped to the side with less risk of injury.

Repetitions

Different repetition patterns can be used to achieve different goals.[2] For instance:
Muscular endurance – 15 to 20 repetitions with a light weight (50–60% of 1rm), with a goal of increasing intramuscular stores of phosphocreatine and ATP, as well as speeding clearance of muscle contraction byproducts
Muscular strength – 2 to 6 repetitions with heavier weight (80–90% of 1rm) to build contractile proteins
Muscular hypertrophy – To increase muscle size, 6–12 repetitions with a weight equivalent to 60–80% of one’s 1rm should be carried out.

Written by kiransawhney

August 26, 2008 at 7:50 am

Bosu- Strength Training-Series 33

leave a comment »

1. Overhead Press
Note that the correct name for the Overhead Press is Press. The Press is always done Overhead. Many say Overhead Press to avoid confusion with the Bench Press. The Bench Press is a variation of the Press, not the other way around.
Sit on Bosu with abs tight and back straight. Hold the Dumbells or a barbell in hands and exhaling, take the hands up. Press the bar from your front shoulders overhead until your elbows are locked. Do 20 repetitions of 3 sets.

Like with any barbell exercise, you’ll have problems finding balance the first time you try to Overhead Press. Start light, focus on your technique & add weight progressively. You’ll improve.

Benefits of The Overhead Press.

You can lift more weight with the Bench Press than with the Overhead Press. But the Overhead Press has many benefits over the Bench Press. Some examples:

Full Body. The Overhead Press works your body as one piece. Your trunk & legs stabilize the weight while your shoulders, upper-chest & arms press the weight overhead.

Builds Muscle. Abs & back stabilize the weight. Shoulders, upper-chest & triceps press the weight overhead. The Overhead Press builds the physique.

Healthy Shoulders. The Bench Press works your front shoulders more than your back shoulders. The Overhead Press works all shoulder heads equally. Alternating the Overhead Press with the Bench Press minimizes risks of shoulder injuries caused by muscle imbalances.

It’s Fun. Picking up a weight from the floor & pressing it overhead is more fun than pressing the same weight while lying on a Bench.

Grip Width. About 46cm/18″. The larger your build, the wider your grip. Hands should never touch your shoulders.
Gripping the Bar. Grip is same as for the Bench Press. Bar close to your wrist, in the base of your palm. Not close to your fingers.

Chest Up. Make a big chest & lift it up. Makes it easier to use your back muscles & shortens the distance the bar has to travel.
Elbows Forward. Elbows in front of the barbell when looking from the side. Not upper-arms parallel with the floor, it’s not a Front Squat.
Look Forward. Looking up is bad for your neck. Look forward, fix a point on the wall before you. Makes it impossible to arch your lower back, thus increasing safety. Squeeze your glutes hard.

You won’t see many people do the Overhead Press in the average gym. Hard to find someone to teach you how to do the Overhead Press correctly.

Performing the Overhead Press. Press the bar overhead in a straight line, that’s the shortest distance from start to finish. Unfortunately your head is in the way. So you’ll need to move your head & torso during the Overhead Press.

Tilt Head Back. Quickly tilt your head back so the bar can pass your chin/nose without hitting them. Keep looking forward.
Shift Torso Forward. Once the bar reaches forehead level, shift your torso forward. Continue pressing the weight overhead.
Head Forward. Your chin should almost touch your chest when the weight is overhead. Look forward, not down.
Lock Everything. Squeeze shoulders, traps & back. Lock your elbows.

Tips to Improve Your Overhead Press Technique. Common errors you’ll make while learning how to Overhead Press with correct technique.

Elbows Forward, Chest Up. You’ll forget to reposition yourself between reps at first. Start each rep with elbows in front of the bar & chest up.
Bar High. The higher the bar on your chest, the shorter the distance it has to travel. Put the bar close to your clavicles. Quickly tilt your head back & forth. Clavicles might hurt at first, your skin will adapt & thicken.
Go Forward. You’ll miss reps if you stay back vs. getting under the bar. Shift your torso forward when the bar reaches forehead level.
Breathing. If you breathe at the top, you can bounce the bar off your chest making the next rep easier. Breathe at the bottom & you’ll press from a dead stop, making the next rep harder. The former allows more weight. The latter makes the exercise harder, making the former easier.

Written by kiransawhney

August 26, 2008 at 6:14 am

Bosu- Strength Training-Series 33

leave a comment »

1. Overhead Press
Note that the correct name for the Overhead Press is Press. The Press is always done Overhead. Many say Overhead Press to avoid confusion with the Bench Press. The Bench Press is a variation of the Press, not the other way around.
Sit on Bosu with abs tight and back straight. Hold the Dumbells or a barbell in hands and exhaling, take the hands up. Press the bar from your front shoulders overhead until your elbows are locked. Do 20 repetitions of 3 sets.

Like with any barbell exercise, you’ll have problems finding balance the first time you try to Overhead Press. Start light, focus on your technique & add weight progressively. You’ll improve.

Benefits of The Overhead Press.

You can lift more weight with the Bench Press than with the Overhead Press. But the Overhead Press has many benefits over the Bench Press. Some examples:

Full Body. The Overhead Press works your body as one piece. Your trunk & legs stabilize the weight while your shoulders, upper-chest & arms press the weight overhead.

Builds Muscle. Abs & back stabilize the weight. Shoulders, upper-chest & triceps press the weight overhead. The Overhead Press builds the physique.

Healthy Shoulders. The Bench Press works your front shoulders more than your back shoulders. The Overhead Press works all shoulder heads equally. Alternating the Overhead Press with the Bench Press minimizes risks of shoulder injuries caused by muscle imbalances.

It’s Fun. Picking up a weight from the floor & pressing it overhead is more fun than pressing the same weight while lying on a Bench.

Grip Width. About 46cm/18″. The larger your build, the wider your grip. Hands should never touch your shoulders.
Gripping the Bar. Grip is same as for the Bench Press. Bar close to your wrist, in the base of your palm. Not close to your fingers.

Chest Up. Make a big chest & lift it up. Makes it easier to use your back muscles & shortens the distance the bar has to travel.
Elbows Forward. Elbows in front of the barbell when looking from the side. Not upper-arms parallel with the floor, it’s not a Front Squat.
Look Forward. Looking up is bad for your neck. Look forward, fix a point on the wall before you. Makes it impossible to arch your lower back, thus increasing safety. Squeeze your glutes hard.

You won’t see many people do the Overhead Press in the average gym. Hard to find someone to teach you how to do the Overhead Press correctly.

Performing the Overhead Press. Press the bar overhead in a straight line, that’s the shortest distance from start to finish. Unfortunately your head is in the way. So you’ll need to move your head & torso during the Overhead Press.

Tilt Head Back. Quickly tilt your head back so the bar can pass your chin/nose without hitting them. Keep looking forward.
Shift Torso Forward. Once the bar reaches forehead level, shift your torso forward. Continue pressing the weight overhead.
Head Forward. Your chin should almost touch your chest when the weight is overhead. Look forward, not down.
Lock Everything. Squeeze shoulders, traps & back. Lock your elbows.

Tips to Improve Your Overhead Press Technique. Common errors you’ll make while learning how to Overhead Press with correct technique.

Elbows Forward, Chest Up. You’ll forget to reposition yourself between reps at first. Start each rep with elbows in front of the bar & chest up.
Bar High. The higher the bar on your chest, the shorter the distance it has to travel. Put the bar close to your clavicles. Quickly tilt your head back & forth. Clavicles might hurt at first, your skin will adapt & thicken.
Go Forward. You’ll miss reps if you stay back vs. getting under the bar. Shift your torso forward when the bar reaches forehead level.
Breathing. If you breathe at the top, you can bounce the bar off your chest making the next rep easier. Breathe at the bottom & you’ll press from a dead stop, making the next rep harder. The former allows more weight. The latter makes the exercise harder, making the former easier.

Written by kiransawhney

August 26, 2008 at 6:14 am

Bosu- Pilates-Series 31

leave a comment »

1. DOUBLE LEG STRETCH

Lie on Bosu on the back with both knees bent and feet off the floor. Place the hands behind the head. Float the head off the Bosu.
Practice 3 sets of breath with hollowing. Feel the belly deflate with the hollow.
Lower leg demands more abdominal control. If you feel the back, bring the leg higher or return to beginner version. This is about the abdominals working!

To start:

Lie on back with both knees bent and feet off the floor. The hands are placed on each knee. Float the head off the Bosu.
Exhale, hollow and extend legs and arms towards opposite walls. *(If back is working, modify the range or go back to beginner version).
Inhale, and circle arms from overhead towards the extended legs.
Exhale, deepen the hollow, touch hands to bent knees and flex upper spine closer to the knees.
Repeat three more sets.

2. Criss Cross

Lie down on Bosu.
Inhale: Your upper body is in a full curve, your abs are pulling your bellybutton down to your spine, and your legs are in tabletop position.

Exhale: Reach your left leg out long, and as you keep the elbows wide, rotate your torso toward the bent right knee so that your left armpit is reaching toward the knee.

Inhale: Inhale as you switch legs and bring the trunk through center

Exhale: Extend the right leg. Rotate your upper body toward the left knee. Keep your chest open and elbows wide the whole time. Resist the urge to hold yourself up with your arms. Make this exercise about the abs.

Repetitions: Start with 6 and work your way up to 10.

Tip: You must keep a stable, neutral pelvis as you rotate the spine. No tucking, tilting, or rocking please!

To Modify Criss Cross:
The higher you work your legs, the easier the exercise will be on your lower back. Keep your legs high until you have enough abdominal strength to maintain a neutral pelvis throughout the exercise.

Try working just the upper body part of the exercise. You can leave your feet flat on the floor, with the knees bent and the legs parallel.

Written by kiransawhney

August 24, 2008 at 8:56 am

Bosu- Pilates-Series 31

leave a comment »

1. DOUBLE LEG STRETCH

Lie on Bosu on the back with both knees bent and feet off the floor. Place the hands behind the head. Float the head off the Bosu.
Practice 3 sets of breath with hollowing. Feel the belly deflate with the hollow.
Lower leg demands more abdominal control. If you feel the back, bring the leg higher or return to beginner version. This is about the abdominals working!

To start:

Lie on back with both knees bent and feet off the floor. The hands are placed on each knee. Float the head off the Bosu.
Exhale, hollow and extend legs and arms towards opposite walls. *(If back is working, modify the range or go back to beginner version).
Inhale, and circle arms from overhead towards the extended legs.
Exhale, deepen the hollow, touch hands to bent knees and flex upper spine closer to the knees.
Repeat three more sets.

2. Criss Cross

Lie down on Bosu.
Inhale: Your upper body is in a full curve, your abs are pulling your bellybutton down to your spine, and your legs are in tabletop position.

Exhale: Reach your left leg out long, and as you keep the elbows wide, rotate your torso toward the bent right knee so that your left armpit is reaching toward the knee.

Inhale: Inhale as you switch legs and bring the trunk through center

Exhale: Extend the right leg. Rotate your upper body toward the left knee. Keep your chest open and elbows wide the whole time. Resist the urge to hold yourself up with your arms. Make this exercise about the abs.

Repetitions: Start with 6 and work your way up to 10.

Tip: You must keep a stable, neutral pelvis as you rotate the spine. No tucking, tilting, or rocking please!

To Modify Criss Cross:
The higher you work your legs, the easier the exercise will be on your lower back. Keep your legs high until you have enough abdominal strength to maintain a neutral pelvis throughout the exercise.

Try working just the upper body part of the exercise. You can leave your feet flat on the floor, with the knees bent and the legs parallel.

Written by kiransawhney

August 24, 2008 at 8:56 am

Bosu- Pilates-Series 30

leave a comment »

1. Hundreds
Lie down on top of Bosu. Keep your legs straight up. Exhale and slowly lift your head and torso up. Raise up your hands also. Now you have to pump your hands as if bouncing the ball. Simultaneously, breathe 5 count inhale through the nose and 5 count exhale through the mouth. This makes it 10 count. Do 10 times and you would complete 100. When you exhale, pull the naval in towards the spine. This works on transverse abdominus muscle. Excellent exercise for core conditioning.
The hundred is a classic Pilates exercise.

The hundred is often used as a dynamic warm-up for the abdominals and lungs. It requires that you coordinate your breath with the movement, and be strong and graceful at the same time. It is challenging.

Take five short breaths in and five short breaths out (like sniffing in and puffing out). While doing so, move your arms in a controlled up and down manner – a small pumping of the arms.

Be sure to keep your shoulders and neck relaxed. It is the abdominal muscles that should be doing all the work.

Do a cycle of 10 full breaths. Each cycle is five short in-breaths and then five short out-breaths.
The arms pump up and down a few inches, in unison with your breath.
Keep your abs scooped, your back flat on the floor, and your head an extension of your spine, with the gaze down. OK – not hard!

To finish: Keep your spine curved as you bring your knees in toward your chest. Grasp your knees and roll up. Take a deep breath in and out.

Tips:

To make the hundred more challenging: Lower your legs. Do not lower your legs past where you can control the movement. Don’t let your spine peel up off the floor as you lower the legs.

To modify the hundred for back or neck problems: Do this exercise with your knees bent and the feet flat on the floor.
You can do this exercise with the legs extended but the head left down on the Bosu. This modification is often used by people who need to protect their necks.

2. Single leg stretch
Lie down on Bosu Your back is resting on the Bose. Slowly bring your head and torso up. Now bring one leg straight up and grab it with both the hands. You should be holding from the calf muscle. Inhale for 2 counts and pull the leg towards yourself, increasing the stretch. Exhale and switch the leg. Both legs should be straight and not bending. They move like scissors.

Written by kiransawhney

August 23, 2008 at 1:33 am