Kiran Sawhney

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Archive for the ‘balance’ Category

Exercise on Bosu

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1. Jump up high on Bosu. This is safe and low impact. It is good cardio exercise. Make sure to land back on Bosu. You need to practice stabilising and balancing before attempting this.

2. Ski front & back as if walking on top of Bosu.

3. Shift your weight on front-on the ball of your feet. This is good balancing exercise.

Now shift the weight on your heels and lift the toes up.

4. Shift the weight on the outside of feet

After this shift weight inside

This finishes the warm up.

Written by kiransawhney

August 2, 2008 at 5:38 am

Exercise on Bosu. Series 1

leave a comment »

1. Jump up high on Bosu. This is safe and low impact. It is good cardio exercise. Make sure to land back on Bosu. You need to practice stabilising and balancing before attempting this.

2. Ski front & back as if walking on top of Bosu.

3. Shift your weight on front-on the ball of your feet. This is good balancing exercise.

Now shift the weight on your heels and lift the toes up.

4. Shift the weight on the outside of feet

After this shift weight inside

This finishes the warm up.

Written by kiransawhney

August 2, 2008 at 5:38 am

Exercise on Bosu. Series 1

leave a comment »

1. Jump up high on Bosu. This is safe and low impact. It is good cardio exercise. Make sure to land back on Bosu. You need to practice stabilising and balancing before attempting this.

2. Ski front & back as if walking on top of Bosu.

3. Shift your weight on front-on the ball of your feet. This is good balancing exercise.

Now shift the weight on your heels and lift the toes up.

4. Shift the weight on the outside of feet

After this shift weight inside

This finishes the warm up.

Written by kiransawhney

August 2, 2008 at 5:38 am

Exercise on Bosu. Series 1

leave a comment »

1. Jump up high on Bosu. This is safe and low impact. It is good cardio exercise. Make sure to land back on Bosu. You need to practice stabilising and balancing before attempting this.

2. Ski front & back as if walking on top of Bosu.

3. Shift your weight on front-on the ball of your feet. This is good balancing exercise.

Now shift the weight on your heels and lift the toes up.

4. Shift the weight on the outside of feet

After this shift weight inside

This finishes the warm up.

Written by kiransawhney

August 2, 2008 at 5:38 am

Fitness Trends 2008

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+ Pilates will continue to grow as one of the nation’s most popular fitness trends. Based on the century-old teachings of Joseph Pilates, this artful discipline was originally designed to give dancers muscle strength without added bulk. This form of exercise is ideal for individuals seeking to improve strength, posture, flexibility and body awareness. Every Pilates exercise movement requires control of the entire body and focuses on the quality of movement, correct alignment and proper breathing.

+ More and more fitness classes will focus on core strength workouts. To achieve balance, strength and stability of the core (i.e., the body’s center of power), exercise classes that utilize stability balls, medicine balls, core boards, etc., will continue to gain popularity. Having a strong core is essential because the body’s core muscles serve as the foundation for all other movement. The muscles of the hips and torso help stabilize the spine and pelvis, and provide the foundation for safe and efficient movement in the extremities. Training the muscles of the core may also help correct postural imbalances that can lead to injuries.

+ “Active relaxation” is on the rise. Gentler forms of exercise that promote better sleep, longevity, reduced stress, increased energy and an overall sense of well being will continue to compete with traditional strength, weight loss and other forms of exercise programs. The aging population has realized that fitness is more than vanity, and that flexibility, meditation/breathing, yoga and other holistic exercise routines will provide long-lasting and meaningful benefits.

+ Sport-specific training will continue to guide athletes and the general public into fitness facilities. As the number of marathon runners, tennis players and other athletes increases, so does the importance of sport-specific training. On today’s playing fields, the athletes are bigger, stronger and faster than ever before. A sport-specific training program involves focusing on the specific skills associated with an activity (e.g., tennis players strengthening the rotator cuff muscles to improve their serve), while improving cardio respiratory endurance, muscle strength and flexibility.

+ Seniors’ awareness of the importance of strength training will increase. Osteoporosis weakens bones to the point where they break easily, especially bones in the hip, spine and wrist. Approximately 25 million Americans have osteoporosis – 80 percent are women. Weight bearing exercises, done on a regular basis, are best for preventing it. Research also reveals that strength training can help control cholesterol and blood sugar levels, manage arthritis pain and reduce the risk of disabling falls.

+ On-line personal training will continue to gain popularity. Training online saves money and time, overcomes barriers to facility access and helps encourage individuals to stay active. Many of these programs offer practical tips on exercise, one-on-one fitness consultations with certified fitness professionals, coaching and training tools, and portable exercise tools that help individuals incorporate fitness into their busy schedules. On-line person training is valuable, but it typically is not as effective as having one-on-one contact with a certified fitness professional.

+ The need for personal training will increase. It appears, unfortunately, that most Americans lack the commitment, motivation, and/or knowledge of fitness to stick with their exercise routines. In fact, it is estimated that 50 percent of individuals who start an exercise program quit within the first 6 months. Many individuals have found that just a few sessions with a well-trained, certified fitness professional helps them refine and recommit to their workout programs. The net effect is that they are more likely to safely achieve the results they desire.

+ Circuit-training classes, which combine cardio with strength training, will become more popular. The focus of these classes is to combine cardio and strength training into one workout to meet the needs of so many Americans who are “time starved” and want to get the greatest training effect in the shortest amount of time. Combo classes also should help to improve exercise adherence because they enable individuals to achieve more in less time.

+ Exercises will increasingly become a family affair. Given the growing epidemic of childhood obesity, there is a tremendous need to identify ways to encourage kids to become more physically active. Fortunately, many parents are not only telling their children about the benefits of being physically active, but are also serving as fitness role models. The name of the game is to choose activities that each member of the family can enjoy, regardless of age, fitness level or athletic ability.

+ Corporations will continue to urge employees to participate in wellness exercise programs. The “bottom line” is the bottom line for companies. With the state of the economy and the increased pace of technology, there is a growing epidemic of stress-related diseases among Americans in the workforce costing companies billions each year. Corporate wellness programs provide exercise equipment and “health advisers” to their staff. Employers who offer such programs may benefit from reduced healthcare costs, absenteeism, injury rates and turnover and improved job performance, productivity and morale.

This article written by Kiran Sawhney will also be found on the following web site:
http://www.healthlibrary.com/reading/fitnessmantra/article5.html

3 new exercises

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Another fad? A cult for the over-privileged? Think again. With the aging of our population and the increasing trend toward mindful, moderate health practices, new forms of exercises are taking over the old ones. Some of them, we are blissfully unaware of, in our country. Through this piece of article I am trying to inspire you towards some new trends towards fitness.

The Lotte Berk exercise method
The dancer Lotte Berk developed the Lotte Berk exercise method in the late 1940s. Lotte had been a dancer with several modern dance companies including the Ballet Rambert after fleeing Nazi Germany during the Second World War. She then suffered severe spinal injuries in a car accident and developed her own method of exercise to escape her wheelchair and rehabilitate herself. Her aims were to regain strength and suppleness, particularly in the pelvic area, the abdominals and the lower back, and to tone and shape her entire musculature, which had weakened substantially during her months without movement.
Core stability

Within months Lotte had regained much of her mobility and was working hard to develop a method of exercise, which would tone, and shape every inch of her body. Drawing on her experience as a dancer and the specific advice of her orthopedic surgeon, Lotte designed an exercise method that brought her what is known today as core stability – strength, balance and stability around the pelvis and the lower back.
Lotte Berk Method is mainly isometric exercises mixed with orthopedic back exercises, all followed by stretch.
Lots of people are using the Lotte Berk method to banish their bulges and never break a sweat. Lotte Berk combines ballet, yoga, modern dance and stretching, strengthening and lengthening the body is the key to a fit figure and perfect posture. Number one goal is to keep people out of pain and to reshape their body aesthetically.

Chuyo Shisei exercise method

The harmony of posture, exercise and relaxation. Shisei – pronounced, “shee-say” and meaning posture in Japanese – is a completely new approach to healthy living. However, Shisei is based on timeless Japanese values that focus on improving balance through posture, exercise, healthy nutrition and relaxation.

Gravity pulls the human body down with significant force and over time many complications can results. Due to the small area that must support the body upright (feet), a severe burden is placed on the body structure, resulting in typical problems associated with back and neck pains, as well as other health-related issues.
The exercise method called “Chuyo Shisei Ho,” is the exercise method that emphasizes movements that specifically address each individual’s posture condition. Therefore, in a Shisei class setting, often everyone moves differently. The method, created by Mr. Ken Katayama, provides a personalized approach to group exercise and healthy living.
Law of Kutsurogi
One Shisei value, or “law of kutsurogi” explains that every body, and mind, prefer specific positions that are naturally comfortable because of repetition. Because of this, Chuyo Shisei focuses on moves that pass the law of kutsurogi and are painless and comfortable.
Law of the Opposite
With muscles being attached to the human body bone structure, the body operates at a unit. Therefore, in many cases, the law of the opposite applies. If a movement hurts when turning one direction, then Chuyo Shisei suggests moving the opposite direction to allow the muscles to move throughout a natural motion without pain or difficulty. The result is less pain moving either direction.
Created by Ken Katayama, “Shisei” is a completely new approach to healthy living based on timeless Japanese values such as posture, exercise, healthy foods and relaxation. The method includes a series of personalized movements designed to improve posture, and therefore body balance.

What is Pilates?
An Exercise in Balance: The Pilates Phenomenon
Pilates is a method of exercise and physical movement designed to stretch, strengthen, and balance the body. With systematic practice of specific exercises coupled with focused breathing patterns, Pilates has proven itself invaluable not only as a fitness endeavor itself, but also as an important adjunct to professional sports training and physical rehabilitation of all kinds. Widely embraced among dancers for years, the exercises–“elephant,” “swan”, the language–“pull navel to spine, and breeaaaathe,” and the look–bright-eyed, refreshed, buoyant-without-necessarily-sweating, is popping up in fitness classes, physical therapy offices, corporate retreats, luxury spas and wellness centers across the country ideals of our next generation.

Practiced faithfully, Pilates yields numerous benefits. Increased lung capacity and circulation through deep, healthy breathing is a primary focus. Strength and flexibility, particularly of the abdomen and back muscles, coordination-both muscular and mental, are key components in an effective Pilates program. Posture, balance, and core strength are all heartily increased. Bone density and joint health improve, and many experience positive body awareness for the first time. Pilates teaches balance and control of the body, and that capacity spills over into other areas of one’s life.
Around 1914, Joseph Pilates was a performer and a boxer living in England and, at the outbreak of WWI, was placed under forced internment along with other German nationals in Lancaster, England. There he taught fellow camp members the concepts and exercises developed over 20 years of self-study and apprenticeship in yoga, Zen, and ancient Greek and Roman physical regimens. It was at this time that he began devising the system of original exercises known today as “matwork”, or exercises done on the floor. He called this regimen “Contrology.”
“Patience and persistence are vital qualities in the ultimate successful accomplishment of any worthwhile endeavor.” While excellent training programs exist in the marketplace today, some are clearly condensed and homogenized, producing less-than-adequately qualified instructors.

Written by kiransawhney

June 2, 2008 at 10:23 pm